How did you first know that you were leadership material?

I’m not asking about when you first thought you wanted to be the boss or when you realized you wanted to direct people to be the best that they could be.

I want you to pinpoint in your mind EXACTLY when you KNEW that you were cut out for it.

I’ll tell you about my moment. It really wasn’t anything too


“Ambition beats genius 99% of the time.” -Jay Leno
What is the defining factor that sets the most successful among us apart from the rest? Some might say that the winners of the proverbial rat race are lucky. Others may claim that those who seem to have reached their dreams are really great with people. Still, more


Have you ever had a team member who went on vacation and the rest of the team seemed to work better with them gone? Do you have someone in your office who blatantly disrespects coworkers and leadership in your organization? Is there an individual who seems to be actively working against the positive company culture you and the rest of the team are striving toward? If you answer yes to any of these questions it is probably time

 “A wise man ought always to follow the paths beaten by great men, and to imitate those who have been supreme, so that if his ability does not equal theirs, at least it will savour of it.” -Machiavelli, The Prince

If you consider yourself a leader, whether in business or as a public figure, you have to constantly engage in personal growth and change in order to be effective in overcoming obstacles and inspiring others to improve. You have be moving constantly in some direction to be successful at accomplishing the goals that you have set. I’ve often heard it put this way: “You can never stand still in life, you are either gaining ground or losing it.” So I ask you this question, who

 

“Passive Micromanagement”.  

As we know, there is almost nothing more embarrassing to an organization than a client mentioning a mistake on something that you present to them. The reasoning for concern is obvious, but many of us really mess up when it comes to solutions. In defense from running across embarrassing situations many managers will get a team of people together, lock themselves in a room, and brainstorm new rules and processes to prevent any future problems from occurring. After a consensus is reached, the management team will trudge out of their den and begin to impose the new regulations on the staff in the effort to keep “the machine” from ever having another hiccup.

 


We all have things we plan to accomplish. I have written down my goals for years because I had always heard that it’s how you get things done. My approach was simple:

Step 1: Write a list of goals.

Step 2: Execute the list (hopefully).

It took me a while to notice something was up, but one day I looked back and noticed


Have you ever heard of the 5 P’s? I’m sure that you have. It goes something like this, “Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance.” Over the last few years I’ve heard people from different parts of the U.S. and in multiple industries quote different renditions of this phrase. It is a powerful thought and works well when a manager is trying to enforce accuracy and perfection from his team or an individual is attempting to stick to their workout commitment. It is effective and safe for most normal tasks and jobs. The problem is that I’m really not too interested in being normal and if you’re reading this I suspect that you aren’t either. I wholeheartedly agree that planning is essential to the success of any goal or idea and there

Mark Cuban has made it known that he writes the word “Listen” at the top of his notepad as he watches investment pitches while filming Shark Tank. He does this with the idea that every time he looks at the page he is reminded to truly grasp the information that the presenter is revealing to him and the other Sharks. I would say that this particular trait has assisted Mr. Cuban even from the very beginning of his career. Just after college he noticed a niche that needed to be serviced and learned the skills necessary to fill it. This resulted in him building MicroSolutions and later selling it for $6 million and launching him into a high level and successful career. It can be tremendously easy to get lost staring at a screen for hours on end while working on a pet project or to take the same zombifying path through your city every day and pay no attention, but leaders need to be mindful of what is happening around them in order to be effective.
Here are Three Ways to Use Mindfulness to Your Advantage: